Tag Archives: nostalgic

Huevos Rancheros

Standard
Huevos Rancheros

Growing up in my household, Sunday mornings meant Huevitos Mexicanitos. This translates as “Little Mexican eggs” and as I grew older I learned they were our family’s version of Huevos Rancheros.  I think everyone has their own version of Huevos Rancheros, with variations, but this is how we make them. They’re easy and delicious and remeniscent of happy Sunday mornings.

Nowadays I make them several times a week because my husband is very much a breakfast-eater and these are quick and easy.

HERE´S WHAT YOU NEED:

  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • Tortilla–traditionally corn but I prefer flour
  • Cold cuts: sliced ham, turkey, or maybe even chicken
  • Eggs
  • Salt and Pepper or Tony’s
  • Chunky salsa

HERE´S WHAT YOU DO:

  1. Heat skillet over medium high heat, once warm, pour in a quarter inch of oil and let it get hot. Do not put oil in a cold skillet!
  2. Submerge tortilla. After about 30-60 seconds, flip it to the other side. Let it fry for another 30-60 seconds. Take tortilla out with tongs and rest it on paper towels.
  3. Crack open two or three eggs (or as many as you like) into the same hot oil. Turn down to medium heat.
  4. While eggs are cooking, move tortilla to plate, cover tortilla with thin layer of cold cuts. I prefer ham. Michael prefers turkey. Doesn´t matter.
  5. The eggs should be getting crispy around the edges. This makes for optimal deliciousness. Use spatula to splash hot oil onto the tops of the eggs so that all the whites become opaque and so that a thin layer forms over the yolks.
  6. Carefully slide spatula under eggs, place them on the tortilla. Pat gently with paper towel to absorb extra oil.
  7. Sprinkle a little salt and pepper or Tony’s over the yolks.
  8. Top with chunky salsa.

IMAG0914 IMAG0917

IMAG0925

IMAG0908

Sketchy chorizo.

I like to serve refried black beans on the side. BUT HERE´S THE THING ABOUT THE BEANS. My mom always refried the beans in chorizo. The problem is finding good chorizo. I go to Mexico at least once a year–usually in January, and try to bring home a year’s supply of chorizo. Invariably, we run out by about March or April. And then I’m sad for the rest of the year because of my lack of chorizo.

Recently, I found some at our local Rouses that didn’t look good, but looked passable. It´s Johnsonville brand and who knows where the heck that is.  But, previously, I had only ever been able to find this tube chorizo that really creeps me out (see left) because I never trust meat that is packaged in such a way that the meat cannot be seen.

IMAG0910

IMAG0912

Anyway, I found this new chorizo and well, it was okay. I could tell it was okay because I could cut the casing off pretty easily. And the meat was pretty crumbly when I cooked it. These are the signs of decent chorizo. I just hope January comes quickly! We’re getting a little desperate around here.